goodreads: (Peanut: Book geek)
Title: The Little Shop of Happy Ever After
Author: Jenny Colgan
Genre: Chick-lit
Rating: 5/5
# pages: 358
Date read: August 2016

(Disclaimer: this blurb was written by somebody who obviously hasn't read the book, as it's actually WRONG! However, I'm useless at summarizing books myself, and the end result (Nina owning a book-bus) is correct, so I'll leave it as-is.)

Given a back-room computer job when the beloved Birmingham library she works in turns into a downsized retail complex, Nina misses her old role terribly - dealing with people, greeting her regulars, making sure everyone gets the right books for their needs. Then a new business nobody else wants catches her eye: owning a tiny little bookshop bus up in the Scottish highlands. No computers. Shortages. Out all hours in the freezing cold; driving with a tiny stock of books... not to mention how the little community is going to take to her, particularly when she stalls the bus on a level crossing...


Probably my favourite book by Jenny Colgan so far. It was a bit slow to take off, but once it did (basically once Nina first made it to Scotland) I was utterly charmed and just didn't want to put it down! Nina pretty much has my dream job, and I loved reading about her adventures and living vicariously through her.

I'd seen the ending a mile away, but that's okay. You're allowed to in books like these. It was a perfect comfort read.
goodreads: (Peanut: Book geek)
Title: Atlantia
Author: Ally Condie
Genre: Dystopian
Rating: 2.5/5
# pages: 368
Date read: April, 2016

For as long as she can remember, Rio has dreamt of the sand and sky Above - of life beyond her underwater city of Atlantia. But in a single moment, all her plans for the future are thwarted when her twin sister, Bay, makes an unexpected decision, stranding Rio Below. Alone, ripped away from the last person who knew Rio's true self - and the powerful siren voice she has long hidden - she has nothing left to lose.

Guided by a dangerous and unlikely mentor, Rio formulates a plan that leads to increasingly treacherous questions about her mother’s death, her own destiny, and the complex system constructed to govern the divide between land and sea. Her life and her city depend on Rio to listen to the voices of the past and to speak long-hidden truths.


Not a particularly good book, but a question was asked in the first chapter that I desperately want answered, so I kept reading regardless, hoping that it was a good answer, so it'd be worth it!

Fortunately it was a decent enough answer, so I wasn't disappointed in that regard, but the writing just couldn't live up to what I'd expected from Ally Condie. It was just plain unengaging (for want of better word), so if it hadn't been for wanting to know the aforementioned answer, I probably never would have gotten through the book.

There were a lot of other questions left unanswered though, and as a whole, I just didn't find the book neither terribly well-written nor interesting. A shame, because it really did have a lot of potential.
goodreads: (Peanut: Book geek)
Title: One Year Off
Author: David Elliot Cohen
Genre: Non-fiction, Memoir
Rating: 4/5
# pages: 320
Date read: February 2016

A year off from work. A meandering, serendipitous journey around the globe with the people you love most. No mortgage, no car payments, no pressure. Though it sounds like an impossible dream for most people, one day David Cohen and his family decide to make it a reality. With his wife and three children, Cohen sets off on a rollicking journey, full of laugh-out-loud mishaps, heart-pounding adventures, and unforeseen epiphanies.

Readers join the Cohen family and trek up a Costa Rican volcano, roam the Burgundy canals by houseboat, traverse the vast Australian desert, and discover Istanbul by night. Through it all, the family gets the rare opportunity to get to know each other without the mundane distractions of television and video games, discovering the world through new eyes and gaining fresh perspective on life and priorities.


Really interesting book, and I loved living vicariously through the Cohen family. It's the next best thing to being there myself, and I liked how David didn't sugar coat anything. Things were the way they were - the good as well as the bad.

A shame that David's emails home became less and less detailed as the time went on - their time in Costa Rica and Europe was wonderfully elaborate, but after that weeks and even months disappeared with no real mention. If it hadn't been for that, I'd have rated it a full 5 stars, but though very understandable, it was a tad frustrating.

Still, he mentioned a lot of places I wanted to go (or go back!) which made for fascinating reading, and all in all I've definitely caught the travel bug!
goodreads: (Peanut: Book geek)
Title: Veronika Decides to Die
Author: Paulo Coelho
Genre: Fiction
Rating: 3.5/5
# pages: 210
Date read: October, 2015

Twenty-four-year-old Veronika seems to have everything she could wish for: youth and beauty, pleny of attractive boyfriends, a fulfilling job, and a loving family. Yet something is lacking in her life. Inside her is a void so deep that nothing could possibly ever fill it. So, on the morning of November 11, 1997, Veronika decides to die. She takes a handful of sleeping pills expecting never to wake up.

Naturally Veronika is stunned when she does wake up at Villete, a local mental hospital, where the staff informs her that she has, in fact, partially succeeded in achieving her goal. While the overdose didn't kill Veronika immediately, the medication has damaged her heart so severely that she has only days to live.


I've only read two Paulo Coelho books so far, but my impression of "Veronika Decides to Die" is much the same as my impression of "The Alchemist": I'm not entirely sure what I think of it, but it's so well written that I'm glad I've read it all the same. The writing style is so subtly captivating that I found myself devouring the book without really being able to make up my mind whether or not I actually like it.

"Veronika Decides to Die" had the option of being a really depressing book, but instead turned out to be life-affirming and optimistic.

I don't think it's a book I'll ever reread, and I'm no closer to rushing out and reading more of Coelho's books than I was prior to reading this - but I'm glad I've read it all the same, and would recommend it in a heartbeat.
goodreads: (Peanut: Book geek)
Title: Cooking as Fast as I Can: A Chef's Story of Family, Food and Forgiveness
Author: Cat Cora
Genre: Memoir
Rating: 4/5
# pages: 256
Date read: September, 2015

Before she became a celebrated chef, Cathy Cora was just a girl from Jackson, Mississippi, where days were slow and every meal was made from scratch. Her passion for the kitchen started in her home, where she spent her days internalizing the dishes that would form the cornerstone of her cooking philosophy incorporating her Greek heritage and Southern upbringing - from crispy fried chicken and honey-drenched biscuits to spanakopita. But outside the kitchen, Cat's life was volatile.

In Cooking as Fast as I Can, Cat Cora reveals, for the first time, coming-of-age experiences from early childhood sexual abuse to the realities of life as a lesbian in the deep South. She shares how she found her passion in the kitchen and went on to attend the prestigious Culinary Institute of America and apprentice under Michelin star chefs in France. After her big break as a co-host on the Food Network's Melting Pot, Cat broke barriers by becoming the first-ever female Iron Chef.



Full disclosure: I knew nothing about Cat Cora prior to picking up this book. However, I've long been interested in chef's memoirs, so I knew I wanted to read it all the same.

As many memoirs it was a bit slow to start, but after about 50 pages, it quickly made up for it and I found it difficult to put down. Cat's journey from cooking at home with her grandmother to being the first female Iron Chef and opening her own restaurants was absolutely fascinating, and certainly made me try my hand at cooking some of her delicious-sounding meals as well!

The story of Cat's rise to stardom was nicely seasoned with anecdotes from her more private life, and I appreciated the insight we got into her family, her relationships and her personal life in general. Cat Cora arose from the pages as a fully formed human being, instead of merely a 2-dimensional chef.

I'll have to check her out on youtube, and see if I can find any of her Iron Chef competitions.
goodreads: (Peanut: Book geek)
Title: The Loveliest Chocolate Shop in Paris
Author: Jenny Colgan
Genre: Chick-lit
Rating: 3/5
# pages: Audiobook ~12hrs
Date read: March, 2014

As dawn breaks over the Pont Neuf, and the cobbled alleyways of Paris come to life, Anna Trent is already awake and at work; mixing and stirring the finest, smoothest, richest chocolate; made entirely by hand, it is sold to the grandes dames of Paris.

It's a huge shift from the chocolate factory she worked in at home in the north of England. But when an accident changed everything, Anna was thrown back in touch with her French teacher, Claire, who offered her the chance of a lifetime - to work in Paris with her former sweetheart, Thierry, a master chocolatier.

With old wounds about to be uncovered and healed, Anna is set to discover more about real chocolate - and herself - than she ever dreamed.

I picked up this book because I absolutely adored Jenny Colgan's Welcome to Rosie Hopkins' Sweetshop of Dreams, but unfortunately this novel didn't come close to living up to my expectations. It was a decent chick-lit, but didn't charm me the way her other book did. Probably because I never really became fond of Anna or Claire, and therefore didn't much care what happened to them.

It had its moments, which is why I still give it 3 stars, but fell far short of what I had hoped for.
goodreads: (Peanut: Book geek)
Title: The Keepers of the Library (Will Piper, #3)
Author: Glenn Cooper
Genre: Suspense
Rating: 4.5/5
# pages: 384
Date read: October, 2013

Florida, 2026. Will Piper, former FBI agent, is retired and living a life of leisure, his days filled with sun and fishing, his thoughts far from the notorious "Doomsday Killer" case that vaulted him into minor celebrity status fifteen years earlier. But according to what that investigation uncovered at a secret government site in Nevada, the world will change irrevocably on February 9, 2027. Is it the End of Days? No one knows what the Horizon, as it's been called, will bring, and much of the world is suspended between pre-apocalyptic hedonism and despair.

When a new Doomsday Killer emerges-inexplicably targeting only Chinese names--and Will's teenage son, Phillip, disappears after receiving a mysterious email from the other side of the world, Will is instantly drawn back into the case. The breathless, high-stakes adventure that Will is pulled into spans centuries and continents, and may at last reveal what the Library cannot about the future of humankind…if there is to be a future...

I finished this in just two days - would have been less if I hadn't had my niece over for the day :) The third book about Will Piper, and just as I had hoped, this one focused on "The Horizon" in 2027. I'm not entirely sure what I thought of the resolution... it didn't come entirely out of the blue, but unlike most things in book two, there were no hints of it in the previous books either.

However, it did leave the door open for Glenn Cooper to continue his series, so I'm not entirely unhappy about it either :) I've loved the three books so far, and would be very eager to read more, should he decide to continue it. Sure, the first one was the best, because of the mystery of Area 51, but suspense-wise I thought the other two just as good
goodreads: (Peanut: Book geek)
Title: Gregor and the Code of Claw
Author: Suzanne Collins
Genre: Fantasy, YA
Rating: 4/5
# pages: 412
Date read: April, 2013

Everyone in the Underland has been taking great pains to keep "The Prophecy of Time" from Gregor. Gregor knows it must say something awful but he never imagined just how awful: It calls for the warrior's death. Now, with an army of rats approaching, and his mom and sister still in Regalia, Gregor the warrior must gather up his courage to help defend Regalia and get his family home safely. The entire existence of the Underland is in Gregor's hands, and time is running out. There is a code to be cracked, a mysterious new princess, Gregor's burgeoning dark side, and a war to end all wars.

Dark and sad. I found myself crying more than once. And I didn't care terribly for the ending. This is one series where I would have liked an epilogue, because to have it end where it did was just depressing... although I guess it was just open enough to leave room for hope. At least that's what I'm going to tell myself.

That aside, as a whole, I think this was the best book after the first one. If my rating doesn't reflect that, it's because of the sad mood I've been left in after turning the last page. I literally sat pressing the button 4-5 times, because I couldn't believe this was the end. Lizzie was amazing in this one, and I loved how Suzanne Collins planted small seeds in earlier books to create a relationship between her and Ripred. Beautiful :)

An excellent series. I'm glad to have read it.
goodreads: (Peanut: Book geek)
Title: Gregor and the Mark of Secret (Underland Chronicles #4)
Author: Suzanne Collins
Genre: Childrens, Fantasy
Rating: 3.5/5
# pages: 343
Date read: April, 2013

It's only a few months since Gregor and Boots returned from the Underland, leaving their mother behind to heal from the plague. Though Gregor's family receives frequent updates on her condition, they all know Gregor must return to fulfill his role as the warrior who is key to the Underlanders' survival. Accompanied by his now-talkative little sister Boots, still considered the honorary "princess," Gregor joins forces with another princess--12-year-old Luxa--and Ripred the rat to defend the Underlanders and the vulnerable "Nibblers," or mice, from the rat army.

If possible, even darker than the other books in the series, and the only one to end with a cliff-hanger as well! Of course now I HAVE to read the last one... only I hope that it actually is the last one, and that Suzanne Collins didn't just leave the series hanging to focus on The Hunger Games instead.

Anyway, I'm still enjoying this series. I couldn't find this one as an audiobook so read it as an ebook instead, and while it did loose a bit of its charm by not having a narrator to do the voices of especially Boots and Temp, the plot and the growing relationships between the characters still made it well worth reading. I especially enjoy seeing the relationship between Gregor and Luxa and Gregor and Ripred.
goodreads: (Peanut: Book geek)
Title: Gregor and the Curse of the Warmbloods (Underland Chronicles #3)
Author: Suzanne Collins
Genre: Childrens, Fantasy
Rating: 3.5/5
# pages: Audiobook ~8hrs
Date read: March, 2013

Book Two left off with Gregor reading the Prophecy of Blood: a prophecy that calls for Gregor and Boots to return to the Underland to help ward off a deadly plague. But this time, Gregor's mother refuses to let him return to the Underland... until the rat Ripred assures the family that Gregor and Boots are just needed for a short meeting, which the crawlers will attend only if their "princess" Boots is present. Gregor's mom finally relents, on the condition that she go with them. The Underland plague is spreading, and when one of Gregor's family is stricken, he begins to understand his role in the Prophecy of Blood, and must summon all his power to end the biological warfare that threatens the warmbloodedcreatures of the Underland.

A children's book, and like the earlier books in the series, actually nothing special to look at. Yet it has charmed me completely. I think this may have a lot to do with the narrator - I think it might just be one of those books that's better read aloud than read yourself. The plot is fairly standard, but it is a nice comfort read that doesn't even need the rosy glasses of nostalgia to make me enjoy it.

A few surprises about the plague in this one though. I'll be interested to see what happens next.
goodreads: (Peanut: Book geek)
Title: Gregor and the Prophecy of Bane (Underland Chronicles #2)
Author: Suzanne Collins
Genre: Childrens, fantasy
Rating: 3.5/5
# pages: Audiobook ~8hrs
Date read: February 2013

In the months since Gregor first encountered the strange Underland beneath New York City, he's sworn he won't ever go back. But when another prophecy, this time about an ominous white rat known as the Bane, calls for Gregor's help, the Underlanders know the only way they can get his attention is through his little sister, Boots. Now Gregor's quest reunites him with his bat, Ares, the rebellious princess Luxa, and new allies and sends them through the dangerous and deadly Waterway in search of the Bane. Then Gregor must face the possibility of his greatest loss yet, and make life and death choices that will determine the future of the Underland.

I'm "reading" these as audiobooks, which I think is a good thing. The plot itself is nothing special, but the writing works nicely as a story read aloud, and I find myself utterly charmed by the tale. Especially Boots who's just plain adorable :)
goodreads: (Default)
Title: Silver on the Tree
Author: Susan Cooper
Genre: Fantasy, YA
Rating: 2/5
# pages: Audiobook
Date read: September 2012

The Dark is rising in its last and greatest bid to control the world. The servants of the light: Will Stanton, the last of the Old Ones, the mysterious Professor Merriman, and the strange albino Welsh boy, Bran, are helped by three ordinary children in this last desperate battle.

This was weird... with the Drew kids, Bran and Will all in the same book, this had the potential to be the best of the lot... instead it was the worst. I'm not even sure I got the hang of all that happened, because my attention kept wandering and I constantly had to force it to come back.

I know Will is the main character of the series, but I never warmed up to him at all. I don't dislike him, I just couldn't care less. Which is probably why - looking back on the sequence - "Over Sea, Under Stone" is my favourite of the lot.

But at least now I've finally finished them.
goodreads: (Default)
Title: The Grey King
Author: Susan Cooper
Genre: Fantasy
Rating: 3.5/5
# pages: Audiobook ~5.5hrs
Date read: August, 2012

With the final battle between the Light and the Dark soon approaching, Will sets out on a quest to call for aid. Hidden within the Welsh hills is a magical harp that he must use to wake the Sleepers - six noble riders who have slept for centuries.

But an illness has robbed Will of nearly all his knowledge of the Old Ones, and he is left only with a broken riddle to guide him in his task. As Will travels blindly through the hills, his journey will bring him face-to-face with the most powerful Lord of the Dark - the Grey King. The King holds the harp and Sleepers within his lands, and there has yet to be a force strong enough to tear them from his grasp.

I think this may just be my favourite of the lot so far. I warmed to Will in this on, and really liked Bram. His heritage was perhaps slightly contrived, but I thought it worked well enough. I'm not really sure I get what the Grey King was trying to do though... perhaps just work chaos, because he also knew who Bram was?

I'm still not blown away by this series, but it is turning out to be better than I'd originally thought, and now it would just be silly not to finish it ;-)
goodreads: (Default)
Title: The Tenth Chamber
Author: Glenn Cooper
Genre: Suspense
Rating: 4/5
# pages: 345
Date read: August, 2012

Luc Simard is an archaeologist with a flawless academic career. When a book dating to the fourteenth century is found after a fire in a monastery in France, Luc' s old friend Hugo calls him in to decipher the mysterious illustrations that dot the coded manuscript. What Luc and Hugo find is a map that leads them to a chambered cave and the discovery of a lifetime. The secret of the caves lies in the manuscript' s coded pages, but it' s a secret that someone is willing to kill to protect

Glenn Cooper certainly knows how to write page-turners! While The Tenth Chamber isn't quite as good as Library of the Dead it's still WELL worth reading, and has quite a number of the same characteristics as LofD - a narrative split over several millennial, and a government cover-up of an ancient discovery.

It's difficult to say more about the book without giving away spoilers, so suffice to say that I very quickly got sucked into the story-line and was intrigued by the outcome.
goodreads: (Default)
Title: Greenwitch
Author: Susan Cooper
Genre: Fantasy
Rating: 3.5/5
# pages: Audiobook ~6hrs
Date read: August, 2012

Simon, Jane, and Barney, enlisted by their mysterious great-uncle, arrive in a small coastal town to recover a priceless golden grail stolen by the forces of evil -- Dark. They are not at first aware of the strange powers of another boy brought to help, Will Stanton -- nor of the sinister significance of the Greenwitch, an image of leaves and branches that for centuries has been cast into the sea for good luck in fishing and harvest.
Their search for the grail sets into motion a series of distubing, sometimes dangerous events that, at their climax, bring forth a gift that, for a time at least, will keep the Dark from rising.

A 3.5 star review.

So far absolutely the best of the lot. I still by far prefer the Drew kids to Will, but he did grow on me in this book... even if I do wish the four of them had been able to work together instead of separately. I loved Jane's sympathy for and loyalty towards the Greenwitch.

The series work quite well as audiobooks, so I think I will continue with the rest of it in that media as well, even though I do own them as physical books as well.
goodreads: (Default)
Title: Welcome to Rosie Hopkins' Sweetshop of Dreams
Author: Jenny Colgan
Genre: Chick-lit
Rating: 4.5/5
# pages: 465
Date read: July, 2012

Were you a sherbet lemon or chocolate lime fan? Soft chewy ones or hard boiled sweeties (you do get more for your money that way)? The jangle of your pocket money . . . the rustle of the pink and green striped paper bag . . .

Rosie Hopkins thinks leaving her busy London life, and her boyfriend Gerard, to sort out her elderly Aunt Lilian s sweetshop in a small country village is going to be dull. Boy, is she wrong.

Lilian Hopkins has spent her life running Lipton s sweetshop, through wartime and family feuds. As she struggles with the idea that it might finally be time to settle up, she also wrestles with the secret history hidden behind the jars of beautifully coloured sweets.

"Friday Night Knitting Club" only with a sweetshop. It's utterly charming and made me want to rush out to see if I could find one of the old-fashioned sweetshops around here. I was glad to have a box of filled chocolates to eat while reading it though.

I fell in love with the village and the people in it. Lillian and Moray especially. It's a delightful and cozy tale that doesn't require much of the reader, but still provides a very satisfying read.

I'll definitely be checking out more of Jenny Colgan's work.
goodreads: (Default)
Title: Gregor the Overlander
Author: Suzanne Collins
Genre: Fantasy, Childrens
Rating: 4/5
# pages: Audiobook ~6.5hrs
Date read: July, 2012

When eleven-year-old Gregor follows his little sister through a grate in the laundry room of their New York apartment, he hurtles into the dark Underland beneath the city. There, humans live uneasily beside giant spiders, bats, cockroaches, and rats) but the fragile peace is about to fall apart.

Gregor wants no part of a conflict between these creepy creatures. He just wants to find his way home. But when he discovers that a strange prophecy foretells a role for him in the Underland's uncertain future, he realizes it might be the only way to solve the biggest mystery of his life. Little does he know his quest will change him and the Underland forever.

Very sweet story about a boy on an unusual quest to find his father. It was a fun 'read', and the narrator (Paul Boehmer) did an excellent job reading it. I fell completely in love with Boots and loved seeing her interact with the various characters of the Underland. She was absolutely adorable :)

The plot itself isn't anything out of the ordinary, but it's well-written and entertaining.
goodreads: (Default)
Title: Crossed
Author: Ally Condie
Genre: Dystopian
Rating: 3/5
# pages: 367
Date read: December, 2011

Rules are different outside the Society.

Chasing down an uncertain future, Cassia makes her way to the Outer Provinces in pursuit of Ky-taken by the Society to his certain death-only to find that he has escaped into the majestic, but treacherous, canyons. On this wild frontier are glimmers of a different life and the enthralling promise of rebellion. But even as Cassia sacrifices everything to reunite with Ky, ingenious surprises from Xander may change the game once again.

While I gave the first book 5 stars, I was sad to say that this one rated only 3. It wasn't nearly as fascinating nor intricate as Matched, the plot wasn't as interesting and as is so often the case with a second book in a trilogy, it was very obviously a transitory novel. In fact, I guessed that it had to be a trilogy before reading it, simply because of the style of Crossed.

It managed to keep me well enough entertained, but I was in no way blown away by it. I wonder whether or not the last book in the trilogy will be able to live up to the first tone, or if it'll be like Matrix in book form.
goodreads: (Default)
Title: About the Author
Author: John Colapinto
Genre: Suspense
Rating: 2.5/5
# pages: 254
Date read: June, 2011

Despite a severe case of writer's block, Cal Cunningham dreams of writing an autobiographical novel that will permit him to escape from his life as a penniless bookstore stockboy in dirty and dangerous upper Manhattan. Cal's dreams are threatened when he learns that his law student roommate harbors secret literary ambitions of his own. Stewart has just finished writing a page-turning novel - based on Cal's life. When a timely, fatal bicycle accident removes Stewart from the scene, Cal appropriates the manuscript as his own, and places it in the hands of legendarily freocious literary agent Blackie Yaeger, who sells the book and movie rights for two million dollars. Propelled to the top of the bestseller lists, Cal finds that he has realized his most outlandish fantasies of literary success. That is, until he discovers that someone knows his secret.

This book is really the poster child of "What a tangled web we weave, when at first we practise to deceive."

Honestly, I mostly wasn't too impressed. About half way through I could sense that the author was just a couple of pages away from making a really, really bad mistake. I wanted to shake him and make him stop, and the only way I could do that was by putting the book down, so it took me quite a bit longer to read than the size of the book warranted.

I really liked aspects of it, but mostly I felt the main character was too stupid for words, and didn't like him much... it's hard to enjoy a book when you can't feel sympathetic for the main character.
goodreads: (Default)
Title: Artemis Fowl: The Atlantis Complex
Author: Eoin Colfer
Genre: Fantasy, YA
Rating: 3/5
# pages: 331
Date read: January, 2011

Artemis Fowl's criminal ways have finally got the better of him...

Criminal mastermind Artemis Fowl has summoned an elite group of fairies to Iceland. But when he presents his invention to save the world from global warming, he seems different. Something terrible has happened to him.

Artemis Fowl has become nice.

The fairies diagnose Atlantis Complex (that's multiple personality disorder to you and me) - dabbling in magic has damaged his mind. And now the subterranean city of Atlantis is under attack from vicious robots and nice Artemis cannot fight them.

Can fairy ally Captain Holly Short get the real Artemis back - before the mysterious robots destroy the city and every fairy in it?

I think it's about time that Eoin Colfer calls it quits on the Artemis Fowl series. Ever since book 4 (well... book 3 really, but I thought book 4 was HEAPS better than book 3) the series has been steadily declining, and there were just parts of this one that seemed decidedly disjointed. Granted, I read it while sick, so I won't deny that that might have had something to do with it as well.

Unfortunately it was also really badly translated - or rather, it was as if the translator hadn't actually read the book. Part of the Atlantis Complex is that Artemis Fowl is obsessed with the number 5 (no, this isn't a spoiler, it becomes clear within the first very few pages) and even tries to speak in sentences of 5, 10, 15... words. Except in Danish, he doesn't! And when trying to translate back into English, it's obvious that this is something that got lost in translation (after all "the table" is two words and "bordet" just one). I realize this is one of the things that's a big challenge for the translator, but I still think it's a shame that they messed up on a detail that was so obvious to the reader.

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