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Title: People of the Book
Author: Geraldine Brooks
Genre: Fiction
Rating: 10/10
# pages: 372
Date read: August, 2008

Summary: In 1996, Hanna Heath, an Australian rare-book expert, is offered the job of a lifetime: analysis and conservation of the famed Sarajevo Haggadah, which has been rescued from Serb shelling during the Bosnian war. Priceless and beautiful, the book is one of the earliest Jewish volumes ever to be illuminated with images. When Hanna, a caustic loner with a passion for her work, discovers a series of tiny artifacts in its ancient binding--an insect wing fragment, wine stains, salt crystals, a white hair--she begins to unlock the book's mysteries. The reader is ushered into an exquisitely detailed and atmospheric past, tracing the book's journey from its salvation back to its creation.

Review: This is one of those books that I loved without being able to say exactly why. It flowed nicely, and I had a very hard time putting it down. Most importantly, though the focus changed for every chapter, I was disappointed every time a chapter ended, because I got equally wrapped up in the story no matter who the main character was. Wonderful book that I highly recommend :)

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Title: Hvor skyggen falder (Where Shadows Fall)
Author: Teddy Vork
Genre: Horror, short stories
Rating: 7/10
# pages: 111
Date read: August, 2008

Review: Where Shadows Fall is a collection of nerve-wrecking short stories written by a new face on the Danish author road-map - but I'm convinced we'll hear a lot more of him in the future. Teddy Vork understands how to do something even many more experienced authors fail at - how to write a short story collection based on the same common theme where all the stories are still different enough to feel unique, instead of just being different variations of the same tune.

In the collection we're introduced for people who by accident - or coincidence - all discover that you should be careful about where the shadow falls. There's the author who attempts to write a dark novel and thereby discover a surprising and disconcerting side of himself that he can't quite trust - neither consciously nor subconsciously. The landscape architect who managed to close a graveyard and turn it into a park without thinking of the consequences that might have. The unfortunate Balder who realizes one should be careful what he wishes for. Katherine who doesn't believe in goblins... but who else could be eating the porridge on the attic? The mother who discovers that she and her daughter have gotten lost in the fog. And finally my personal favourite - the poor taxi-driver who discovers his destiny, when he's asked to drive a handsome young man to his own address... where his wife is home alone.

Teddy Vork fully understands how to build up an atmosphere without having to resort to the element of surprise in order to scare the reader. To be honest, I'm not a huge fan of the horror-genre, so the fact that he still managed to impress me and make it difficult to put down the book proves his talent. I'm looking forward to seeing where this will take him.

Published by Tellerup in 2008. Has yet to be translated to English.

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Title: Where Rainbows End
Author: Cecelia Ahern
Genre: Chick-lit
Rating: 3/5
# pages: 483
Date read: August, 2008

Summary: Where Rainbows End is the amusing story of Alex and Rosie, best friends who grow up together in Ireland and stay close throughout cross-continental moves, marriages, parenthood, family dramas. and professional triumphs. Friends for close to 50 years, the potential for romance between the pair is always under the surface, yet never seems to find the right time or place to become a reality.

Review: A novel written entirely through e-mails, letters and chat logs. It's fairly good, but suffers from two drawbacks. First of all, it's the second book I've read by an author where I LOVED the first, and therefore didn't quite live up to my expectations. Secondly it's one of those books where you get SO frustrated with the two main characters, because they just down settle down and TALK already!

Still, Cecelia is a good writer, and despite the second item being one of my biggest pet peeves in books, she actually managed to make it acceptable to me, because there was so much in the rest of the book, that you didn't just sit around, waiting for the ending to make "everything right". Probably not a book that will end up as one of my favourites, but it was a good way to spend a lazy vacation day.

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Title: Kronprinsessen (Crown Princess)
Author: Hanne-Vibeke Holst
Genre: Fiction
Rating: 9/10
# pages: 411
Date read: August, 2008

Summary: She's married, has three kids together with Thomas and is on her way to Uganda as accompanying wife. One evening before Christmas the 35-year-old Charlotte Damgaard receives a call from the prime minister and is offered the title of Denmark's new minister for the environment. Does she even have a choice?

Review: The first book in Hanne-Vibeke Holst's political trilogy. By accident I happened to read the second book first, and still prefer that one, as it's more about the human aspect and less about the political (which - to be honest - doesn't interest me all that much), but this one is also very captivating and it's easy to become interested in the main characters. I'm looking forward to the last part of the trilogy which will be published this autumn.

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Title: The Colour Purple
Author: Alice Walker
Genre: Cultural
Rating: 7/10
# pages: 253
Date read: August, 2008

Summary: Celie is a poor black woman whose letters tell the story of 20 years of her life, beginning at age 14 when she is being abused and raped by her father and attempting to protect her sister from the same fate, and continuing over the course of her marriage to "Mister," a brutal man who terrorizes her. Celie eventually learns that her abusive husband has been keeping her sister's letters from her and the rage she feels, combined with an example of love and independence provided by her close friend Shug, pushes her finally toward an awakening of her creative and loving self.

Review: It almost feels like sacrilege to admit, but I actually didn't think too much of this book. I saw the movie as a teenager and was very impressed by it, so either my opinion has changed over the years (likely) or I just wasn't too keen on the writing style (also very likely). However, it's one of those books I've always felt like I "ought" to read, so I'm glad finally to have done so.

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Usually I sit right down to write the review after I've finished a book. I couldn't do that with In His Sights. The emotion of it was too raw and the implications too dire. I had to allow the book to 'sink in' somewhat, before putting my thoughts down on paper.

The book is subtitled "A True Story of Love and Obsession" and that line alone describes the entire book. Kate was a completely ordinary person until she started dating the millionaire Paul. In the bright lights of hindsight, the warning bells should have started ringing almost from day one, but Kate grew up with an alcoholic and abusive father, and was therefore more willing to forgive and look past things that others would perhaps have balked at. However, eventually it became too much, even for her, and she decided to leave Paul. But Paul wouldn't allow that - in the past, it had always been he who'd left his girlfriends, and not the other way around, and that was the way it ought to stay, so in an attempt to rewrite history, he started stalking her. At first just by himself, but as time went by, he used his vast fortune to hire others to do his dirty work for him. Kate contacted the appropriate authorities, but nothing she did got him to stop for more than a couple of months at a time.

At the end of the book, Kate is still 'on the run' - moving every couple of months, to get away from his harassment.

I was appalled to read how some people brushed Kate's experiences off with a "He must love you very much." No wonder so few stalkers are actually convicted. But this isn't about love; it's about control.

In His Sights is a no-nonsense and un-sensationalised account of one person's experience with a dedicated stalker, and as such should be required reading - for women to hopefully learn to see the warning signs early enough and take appropriate action; for men to know how to react if somebody they know are pursued by a stalker.

10/10, 279 pages

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Title: Horror.dk
Author: Various
Genre: Horror, short story
Rating: 7/10
# pages: 253
Date read: August, 2008


Review: If you need inspiration for ghost-stories to tell on next year's camping trip - look no further. Horror.dk is all you could ask for and contains material enough for several evenings' worth of storytelling, and nightmare fodder for many nights.

Horror.dk is a new short-story collection with horror stories written by some of Denmark's very best genre authors. There is a huge variety in the stories with everything from ghost-stories as I knew them as a kid, through terrifying murder mysteries to psychological thrillers that leave everything to the reader's own hyperactive imagination. But one red thread runs through them all - they all contain an element of the supernatural.

It is almost impossible to pick a favourite story from the anthology, because they each have their highlights, so it really depends on what you're in the mood for here and now. Everybody know you can always count on Dennis Jürgensen to thrill, and The Night Train is no exception. Teddy Vork manages to create a creepy atmosphere without compare in Delila's Ringlets, the end of Stevie by Carina Evytt makes the reader cold to the very marrow of their bones, and if you read Executioner by Kenneth Bøgh Andersen after dark - it's on your own head. Still, I think it's the last short story in the book, Was is a great word by Bernhard Ribbeck I'll find myself returning to most often, because of the depth he manages to introduce to the main character in the just 30 pages the short story takes up.

Horror is a popular genre, but a genre that's difficult to do well. It takes a really talented author to write a good horror-novel as it's far too easy to either switch into 'gore' instead, or end up with a story so laden with surprise antics that the plot disappears completely. Fortunately the 12 authors of this anthology are all so familiar with the horror-genre that, that they manage to avoid both traps, and the reader is left with a thriller that it's impossible to put down.

Horror.dk is published in Denmark on September 1st, 2008 from Tellerup, and has yet to be translated to English.

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Title: The Book of Lies
Author: Brad Meltzer
Genre: Suspense
Rating: 8/10
# pages: Audiobook, read by Scott Brick
Date read: August, 2008


Review: In Genesis Cain commits fratricide when he murders his brother, Abel. This is the first and most famous murder in the history of the world, yet the murder weapon itself has been lost to time. The Bible mentions nothing about it. Was it a rock? A sharpened stick? Or perhaps Cain's bare hands? According to Brad Meltzer's theories it was something else entirely, and in his thrilling novel, The Book of Lies, Cal Harper finds himself on a breathless search for the world's first murder weapon, eager to find it before time runs out and the hunter suddenly becomes the hunted. But on every step of the way he has to watch out for Ellis - a ruthless murder with a tattoo of the ancient markings of Cain.

Cal's quest takes him to Cleveland, to the home of Jerry Siegel, the creator of Superman. Jerry's father was killed by a shot from a gun, thus inspiring Jerry to invent the bullet proof man. Cal's own father has also been attempted murdered by that same weapon, but where is the connection? What links the world's first murder to Superman and to Cal's father?

In this mixture of folklore and mystery Brad Meltzer once again proves that he is the master of suspense. As always he manages to capture his audience from the very first word, because he dares to throw the reader out into the middle of the action, rather than slowly ease them in via thorough introductions. His writing skills are so undeniable that one easily forgives him small inconsistencies and plot holes, because he has the ability to make the reader believe in him completely while reading. It wasn't until after I had finished the book that I sat back and thought, "Hey, but what about..."

The Book of Lies has been recorded for Hachette Audio by Scott Brick who fully does justice to Brad Meltzer's writings. His voice is easy to understand and expressive, and he understands how to take himself out of the equation, so that my attention was kept focused on the plot, and not on his interpretation of it.

I found myself biking detours to work and even offering to do the dishes after dinner - anything to have time for "just one more chapter".

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Title: Tell Me How The Wind Sounds
Author: Leslie Davis Guccione
Genre: YA
Rating: 6/10
# pages: 160
Date read: August, 2008


Summary: When Amanda first meets Jack, she's scared and angry with him for his weird behaviour. But on the small island they can't avoid bumping into each other. Half against Amanda's will they learn to talk together, and even though they often misunderstand each other, they keep meeting...

Review: YA of the old-fashioned kind with all the clichés of its type. The girl is so popular that everybody falls for her, the old boyfriend is a thoughtless jerk, the new guy is dark and mysterious. The only thing this book has that makes it different is that the 'new guy' is deaf and a lot of sign-language is described in the book. I've always wanted to learn sign-language and that by itself was enough to make the book interesting to me as a kid. To an adult it doesn't offer much.

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Title: The Yada-Yada Prayer Group Gets Real (Book 3)
Author: Neta Jackson
Genre: Christian fiction
Rating: 5/5
# pages: 422
Date read: August 2008, June 2009, July 2012


Summary: Book Three finds Jodi Baxtor's oasis turned upside down when her upstairs neighbors move out and her nemesis, Leslie (Stu) Stuart, moves in! Avis' middle aged cocoon is turned inside out, too, by a beau from her past, and Chanda's future has never looked brighter. But Stu's proximity to the Baxter household will draw her secret to the surface... and no one is ready for the crisis that will follow or the question the group will have to face: Just how far does forgiveness go when it requires investing your life in the forgiven one?

Review: Just as powerful as the first book in the series, this one really spoke to my heart and thus blew me away. The all-encompassing subject here is God is gracious, but that sometimes we need a swift kick in the behind to realize we need His grace. A powerful message, yet Neta Jackson manages to get it across without preaching at her readers. I'd challenge anybody to read it and walk away unmoved.

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Title: The Yada Yada Prayer Group Gets Down (Book 2)
Author: Neta Jackson
Genre: Christian fiction
Rating: 5/5
# pages: 400
Date read: August 2008, June 2009, July 2012


Summary: In this second installment of the series, a robbery, a lynching, and a mourning mother shake up the Yada Yada Prayer Group.

One night, while the Yada Yadas are "gettin' down" with God in prayer, a heroine-crazed woman barges into the house and, at knife-point, demands their valuables.

Then a well-meaning gesture incites a backlash of anger within the group forcing them to confront generations of racial division and distrust. The members of the Yada Yada Prayer Group find themselves learning what true forgiveness is.

Review: Brilliant book. The Yada Yada books speak straight to my heart. I'm challenged to pray, praise God and generally take a closer look at my relationship with God. Do I just pay Him lip-service - or do I actually practise what I preach?

"The YYPG Gets Down" is a fitting continuation of the first book, and it raises an interesting question of forgiveness. Do we forgive even if the other person doesn't repent? Can we repent for the sins of others? (Like the Germans asking the Jews for forgiveness for the Holocaust) How can we accept God's forgiveness and learn to live with what we've done? And how do we cope if somebody we've wronged won't forgive us.

A powerful book, and a breath of fresh air. I need to remember to turn to these books when I feel like my spiritual life needs a 'pick me up'.

But why does Ruth have to speak like Yoda? Talks like this she does. Takes some getting used to.

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Title: Long Walk to Freedom
Author: Nelson Mandela
Genre: Biography
Rating: 10/10
# pages: 586
Date read: August, 2008


Summary: The famously taciturn South African president reveals much of himself in Long Walk to Freedom. A good deal of this autobiography was written secretly while Mandela was imprisoned for 27 years on Robben Island by South Africa's apartheid regime. Among the book's interesting revelations is Mandela's ambivalence toward his lifetime of devotion to public works. It cost him two marriages and kept him distant from a family life he might otherwise have cherished. Long Walk to Freedom also discloses a strong and generous spirit that refused to be broken under the most trying circumstances--a spirit in which just about everybody can find something to admire.

Review: I can't NOT rate this book 10 out of 10 because it's such a necessary book to read in order to understand an important part of South Africa's history. I have friends who came from South Africa, and therefore thought I knew some of what had happened both during apartheid and during the disbandment of it. I was wrong. I could not have imagined the unfairness of the former and the violence of the latter. Now I understand why so many people emigrated from the country in those years.

Mandela is an amazing character who has done more for his country than just about any other person I've heard of... at least in recent history. The book ended right after the election of 1994 though, so it didn't touch much upon his and Winnie's relationship after their separation. She was respectfully and lovingly described in this book, so I'll have to look elsewhere to understand what happened to her in later years.

Long Walk to Freedom is a long book, but Mandela understands how to write interestingly, so the book escapes being either boring or heavy to get through. I highly recommend it.

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Title: When She Was Bad
Author: Louise Bagshawe
Genre: Chick-lit
Rating: 9/10
# pages: 407
Date read: August, 2008


Summary: Lita and Rebecca are worlds apart. From the tough streets of the Bronx, Lita is determined to succeed - whatever the cost. Privileged Rebecca has never wanted for anything. And when she inherits an estate in England, it's just the start of a whole new life. Linked by betrayal, Rebecca and Lita are set against each other. Until they discover that revenge can be very sweet indeed...

Review: Louise Bagshawe is my guilty pleasure. I've so far only encountered one of her books that I didn't love (Venus Envy) and as a general rule I find them difficult to put down once I've started them. This was no exception, and I enjoyed 'wasting' a lazy weekend on it. Her heroines are always larger than life, more beautiful than anybody else and capable of doing anything. They also always move in the higher classes of life - perhaps not at the beginning, but definitely near the end. It's the American dream - for women ;)

After this justification of why I enjoy her books (escapism - pure escapism) I have to say that When She Was Bad is one of her better ones with her two heroines being slightly more human than in some of her other books. I especially enjoyed following the life of Becky - heiress to a huge estate and a company that's quickly going bankrupt and would LOVE to have the money to go stay at her hotel.

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Title: Mary Poppins
Author: Pamela L. Travers
Genre: Childrens
Rating: 5/10
# pages: 158
Date read: August, 2008


Summary: It all starts when Mary Poppins is blown by the east wind onto the doorstep of the Banks house. She becomes a most unusual nanny to Jane, Michael, and the twins. Who else but Mary Poppins can slide up banisters, pull an entire armchair out of an empty carpetbag, and make a dose of medicine taste like delicious lime-juice cordial? A day with Mary Poppins is a day of magic and make-believe come to life!

Review: Unfortunately a huge disappointment. I love the Disney version of it, and assumed the book would be even better. Unfortunately that wasn't the case at all. The movie was much better and Mary Poppins of the book not nearly as charming. I'd probably have liked it more had I been younger when I read it, but under the circumstances it rates no higher than 5 out of 10.

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Title: Stranger With My Face
Author: Lois Duncan
Genre: YA
Rating: 8/10
# pages: 212
Date read: August, 2008


Summary: Have you ever been haunted by the feeling that someone is spying on you, lurking around your house and yard, even entering your bedroom? Are your friends plotting against you when they say they've seen you do things you know you haven't done? What's going on -- and does Laurie really want to find out?

Review: Unlike many other YA books of that time Stranger With My Face actually has a decent ending, which was a refreshing change after Haunted Sister. The book itself is like many of its kind - enjoyable by the target age, but requires nostalgia's rosy hue to be enjoyed by adults. Fortunately I had that :)

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Title: The Scrapbook
Author: Peggy B. Baker
Genre: Chick-lit
Rating: 7/10
# pages: 187
Date read: August, 2008


Review: Natasha and Emma have been best friends ever since their mothers were roommates on the maternity ward. They were playmates as kids, best friends all the way through school, and though life has taken them in very different directions, are still as inseparable as when they were first born.

Emma is happily married, a stay-at-home mom to three wonderful kids, and an avid scrapbooker. Natasha, on the other hand, moves from relationship to relationship, travels all over the world due to her job as a lawyer, doesn't think she has a creative bone in her body, and is perfectly content just being "Auntie Tashi" to Emma's children.

Life seems just about perfect for them both, but early foreshadowing shows the reader that all is not as it ought to be for the two friends.

The Scrapbook is a charming book and love and friendship that'll strike a chord with any female reader - even one who isn't interested in scrapbooking herself (that'd be me). The writing style of the book makes it read like a series of blog entries which allows the reader to feel like she really knows the characters and has been granted a special insight into their lives. This way of writing a novel, as well as the fact that the happenings in the book are all very realistic made me occasionally doubt whether the book was fictional or not, which just added to the feeling of knowing the characters as more than 'just' people in a book.

Like many other chick-lits The Scrapbook doesn't quite escape being predictable at times - something that was made even more apparent because of the heavy use of foreshadowing - but Peggy Baker still managed to surprise me often enough that it didn't become tedious. I might have guessed the ending early, but not how they got there. She would have benefitted from fewer references to Casablanca though. Fortunately I'd seen the movie, but readers who haven't might be thrown for a loop by the numerous mentionings of it.

Peggy Baker herself is an eager scrapbooker which shows in the book, and she realistically describes the scrapbooking community existing online. Even the book's layout is inspired by scrapbooking, with each chapter heading being made in a different style.

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goodreads: (Peanut: Book geek)
Title: Little Women
Author: L.M. Alcott
Genre: Classics
Rating: 9/10
# pages: Audiobook
Date read: August 2008, April 2015


I've read LW many times, and still enjoy each reading of it. This was the first time I've heard it as an audiobook though, and that gave me a new appreciation of it as I find I'm often more likely to be touched by a book I know well if I listen to it rather than if I read it.

I'm one of the few who do not think Laurie and Jo belonged together, so that's never been a disappointment to me, but for the first time I believed the love growing between him and Amy. It's always seemed too convenient for me before, but I found some clues I hadn't seen before, which made it more real to me.

L.M. Alcott has a bad habit of putting morals into most of her books. LW isn't nearly as bad as Jack and Jill (where every chapter ended with a sermon of some kind - got old really fast), but worse than the Rose books.

Reread 2015 For once I have to downgrade my rating somewhat - I no longer feel like it deserves 5 stars. The morals / preaching is much too heavy handed for that, and there were passages I found myself skimming, when LMA got too wordy. Still, the good parts remain very, very good, and the sad parts still make me cry. This time around I especially loved Beth's poem - I don't remember being quite as touched by that in previous read-throughs.
goodreads: (Peanut: Book geek)
Title: Breaking Dawn
Author: Stephenie Meyer
Genre: Fantasy
Rating: 5/5
# pages: 833
Date read: August 2008, December 2009, July 2011, August 2014


As August 13th draws closer, Bella is more sure than ever that she has made the right choice - forsaking her human life to spend eternity with Edward. But a new enemy stalks closer, seeking to tear Bella and Edward apart forever, one with ties to both Vampire and Werewolf.

Can the treaty between the two hold? Or will the new threat force both sides to settle their blood feud once and for all?

Because when the dawn breaks an angel will fall.

Like I had hoped, I adored it. The series has been accused of being misogynistic and advocating paedophilia (laughable), and I'm sure this book will get more of the same, but I really don't see either. Instead I see an amazing book about love, family and friendship in a group of people who just happen to be vampires and werewolves. While the other books were great in their own right, it really felt as if they were just setting the scene for this one. Not that that makes Breaking Dawn better than any of the others, it just made it feel more complete. I loved that Bella became a vampire so early in this book, that we got to see how she reacted to that as well, and how she adjusted to her new life.

Even Jacob became lovable again in this one. I'm glad. I really liked him and hated that Meyer turned him into such a jerk.

Like with the other books in the series, I just couldn't put it down and wish I hadn't had work and sleep interfere so I could've finished sooner.

For my reread I chose to listen to it as an audiobook instead in order to force myself to take it slower, and was pleased to find it was very well recorded indeed.

Reread in 2011: I was in the mood for a book I could disappear completely into and decided to go with a reread to get something I was SURE I'd enjoy. I ended up finishing it in 48 hours, so I'd say I reached my goal.
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Title: The Hidden Man
Author: Anthony Flacco
Genre: Historical fiction, suspense
Rating: 6/10
# pages: 285
Date read: August, 2008


Review: Every day we pass hundreds of people on our way through life. Some we notice and remember, but most we just pass by, forgetting them they second they disappear from our line of sight. The Hidden Man knows this, and takes advantage of being as non-descript as possible.

Famous mesmerizer James "JD" Duncan knows the dangers of these non-descript people, and hires homicide detective Randall Blackburn to act as his personal bodyguard as he settles to spend 10 months in San Francisco during the World Fair of 1919. Detective Blackburn is confused – why hire a detective to do a job that requires more brawl than brain? And why is JD in a state of panic over an attack or assassination attempt that he can’t – or won’t – tell the detective anything about?

Meanwhile Randall Blackburn has problems of his own. In the 9 years that have passed since The Last Nightingale, his two adopted children have grown up and Randall wonders if as a single father he gave especially his strong-minded daughter the direction she needed. It doesn’t help that she shows an instinctive dislike against his fiancée, whom he was otherwise counting on helping on giving his daughter the motherly advice he himself couldn’t.

Revealing any more of the plot would be a shame, as Anthony Flacco has a definite talent for spinning yarns and keeping his readers interested in the characters and universe he unfolds before them. His descriptions of Randall Blackburn and his two children were intriguing and made the characters worth of further investigation.

He would, however, have benefited from a more critical editor, as the sentences would sometimes get knotted up in themselves and require several read-throughs to untangle, and the pacing of the novel varied wildly – rushed in some places and dragging in others. Especially the three-page, very detailed description of somebody burning to death was unnecessarily drawn out. As it was the only graphical scene in the book, it could easily have been shortened or removed altogether to accommodate the more squeamish of Flacco’s readers.

Despite this The Hidden Man is still worth being picked up by anybody interested in historical suspense, and while it is the second book in a series, one can easily read it without having read The Last Nightingale.

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Title: The Rosary
Author: Florence L. Barclay
Genre: Classics, Romance
Rating: 10/10
# pages: Audiobook
Date read: February 2007, August 2008

Summary: "The Rosary" is a beautiful love story. Garth Dalmain falls in love with the Honorable Jane Champion. She loves him back, but does not trust his love, as he is known to be a great lover of beauty, and she - alas - is very plain. Just as she decides to trust him, she receives news that he has been blinded in a hunting accident. She wants to go visit him, but he will not receive her, as he wants only her love - not her pity. With the help of their mutual friend and doctor, she gets the position as his nurse under a presumed name, and thereby gets to know the 'new' Garth.

Review: The Rosary is one of those wonderful but unfortunately completely overlooked books. It deserves to rank as high as books by Jane Austen, L.M. Alcott, Charlotte Bronte and L.M. Montgomery, yet few people have ever heard of it. Such a shame because it is one of the most beautiful and romantic books I've ever read. Florence L. Barclay paints very vivid pictures for her readers and makes the book impossible to put down. I cannot recommend it highly enough.

Unfortunately it's very difficult to find the book except through second-hand bookstores. However, it's available as an e-book through Project Gutenberg here and as an audiobook through Librivox here - both absolutely free for your enjoyment! [/Shameless plug]

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